#VIWFF2020 Blog 2: “Take Me Somewhere Nice” Film Review

#VIWFF2020 Blog 2: “Take Me Somewhere Nice” Film Review

Written by: Katrina Mugume

The highly emotional and senseless period between teenager and young adult is aptly captured in this quirky coming of age road film. A feature debut from director Ena Sendijarević, “Take Me Somewhere Nice” is also the deserved winner of the Rotterdam Special Jury Prize for exceptional artistic achievement.  

Take Me Somewhere Nice is a nuanced kind of coming of age story, with the same naiveté and metamorphosis of youth, yet rich in post-war culture and feminist critique.”

Alma, a fragile yet impulsive Dutch raised girl, leaves her perfectly uneventful life and travels by herself to her home country of Bosnia in hopes of reconnecting with her estranged father who has been hospitalized. There, Alma is stuck in the care of her estranged and apathetic cousin Emir and his charismatic “intern”, Denis. 

Her stubborn defiance is soon met with the reality of unfortunate and episodic circumstances when she is left stranded by her bus after a miscalculated toilet break, left with nothing but a cellphone and the pretty blue dress on her back. Sent to her unwanted rescue, the three find themselves on a bizarre adventure, driving across the perfectly picturesque Bosnian landscapes. Several upside down frames and situations later, Alma is accosted by the dichotomy of her immigrant identity, the raw sexual attraction that draws her to each of the boys and the search for a meaning of life in-between teenager and young woman. 

Sendijarević’s unique storytelling formula combines the minimalist tone of the phlegmatic east with the hyper-stylized cinematography of Emo Weemhoff. Doused in pastel hues, and tightly composed frames held still enough for Alma’s bubble to burst. Take Me Somewhere Nice is a nuanced kind of coming of age story, with the same naiveté and metamorphosis of youth, yet rich in post-war culture and feminist critique. Nothing is obvious, and everything is exciting. This is a film for everyone to see.

-Katrina Mugume

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